Z e t e o
Reading, Looking, Listening, . . . Questioning
A small fence separates densely populated Tijuana, Mexico, right, from the United States in the Border Patrol’s San Diego Sector.  Construction is underway to extend a secondary fence over the top of this hill and eventually to the Pacific Ocean.

Juan Felipe Herrera’s story is a nice one. Born in California in 1948, he grew up picking crops with his migrant worker parents in the San Joaquin and Salinas Valleys.  After graduating from San Diego High School, Herrera went on to complete degrees at UCLA, Stanford and the prestigious University of Iowa Writers’ Workshop. He has […]

ZiR
Categories: Fritz Tucker, ZiLL | 1 Comment
jane jacobs

After having read countless authors who cite Jane Jacobs’ The Death and Life of Great American Cities, and having intuitively come to many Jane Jacobs-esque conclusions on my own over the years, I finally decided it was time to read the original work. Many of the conclusions Jacobs comes to resonate with my personal experience. Critiquing the notion […]

ZiLL
Categories: Ed Mooney | 3 Comments
38085-o

William James is known as the father of American Psychology and a Philosopher of Religious Experience par excellence. He also could exhibit a wide range of mood and sensibility. I just came across this – something new to me – in an account of James’ well-known struggles, especially in his youth, over meaning or purpose […]

Categories: Drew Whitcup, ZiR | Add a Comment
images

John Nichols— Washington Bureau Chief for The Nation Magazine— published a brief piece last week remembering the impact a young Julian Bond made at the 1968 Democratic Convention. Mr. Bond passed away earlier this month at the age of seventy-five after an inspiring career as a civil rights leader, and Nichols’ recounting of his role at the […]

ZiR
Categories: Fritz Tucker, ZiR | 1 Comment
Cultural Revolution Picture

I’ve just read The Chinese Cultural Revolution Reconsidered: Beyond Purge and Holocaust, a collection of essays that consider the social, political, economic, and psychological factors that contributed to the 1966-76 period. It was the first I had read about the Maoist period in years, after my thorough disenchantment with Maoists in Nepal. My renewed interest in the […]

ZiR
Categories: Ed Mooney, ZiR | Add a Comment
images-9

I’ve just received a collection of essays on nature that includes exchanges among academics allied with ecology, literature, and theology. What caught my eye was an essay titled, “Dream Writing.” It reminds me of Thoreau’s phrase, “dreaming awake.” That’s what it was to look skyward from his skiff in the center of Walden Pond. The […]

ZiR
Categories: ZiR | Add a Comment
Gemma

Over the past few weeks, I’ve been pondering these lines from the poem Going Back, which was written in Catalan by Gemma Gorga; translated to English by poet, linguist, and translator Anna Crowe; and published in Six Catalan Poets (Arc Publications, 2013). This poem might be one of those rare gems that transcends those large […]

ZiR
Categories: Drew Whitcup, ZiR | 1 Comment
download (3)

Writing for The Nation, Michelle Chen laments a recent ruling by the regional director of the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) that rejected an attempt by graduate student instructors at The New School to unionize. She notes that despite performing what appears to be “labor” by most measures, graduate student teachers and researchers are considered to […]

ZiR
1962_Volkswagen_Beetle_(2890483723)

There is an undocumented age crisis that occurs in the early thirties. Indeed, the onset of this decade might mark the actual “coming of age.” Eighteen is still shrouded by the incredulous, protective shield of childhood, as is any age before twenty nine. But thirty-three is different. It is lucid and stunned and dismayed at […]

ZiR
Categories: Ed Mooney | 2 Comments
images-1

In my previous post (“Exquisite and Expansive: I”) I tarried with a striking sentence picked up from the pages of The New Yorker.  In his piece on Max Beerbohm, Adam Gopnik, a favorite writer of mine, had written, “There are two kinds of extended sentences: The first is argumentative, the second exquisite.” The idea of […]

larkin with shadow

“Counting” is a beautiful little Philip Larkin poem that I had not read before encountering it in a bilingual collection, with French translations: La vie avec un trou dedans. Thinking in terms of one Is easily done — One room, one bed, one chair, One person there, Makes perfect sense; one set Of wishes can […]

ZiR

Recent Comments

Categories: Ed Mooney | Add a Comment
38085-o

“Counting” is a beautiful little Philip Larkin poem that I had not read before encountering it in a bilingual collection, with French translations: La vie avec un trou dedans. Thinking in terms of one Is easily done — One room, one bed, one chair, One person there, Makes perfect sense; one set Of wishes can […]

September 1, 2015

That James quotation is a mystery, all right. I tried to track it down on the various quotation websites, but they never give specific citations, just authorship. That’s because they’re all copying from one another and could care less. Also, quotations unmoored from their contexts tend to drift away from their original phrasing. I notice that the novelty t-shirt companies, those that adorn their shirts with pictures of famous people along with associated words of wisdom, tend to omit the last words of this particular quote. And for good reason: the quotation makes far more sense witho...

read more... join the conversation >
jane jacobs

“Counting” is a beautiful little Philip Larkin poem that I had not read before encountering it in a bilingual collection, with French translations: La vie avec un trou dedans. Thinking in terms of one Is easily done — One room, one bed, one chair, One person there, Makes perfect sense; one set Of wishes can […]

ZiLL

August 31, 2015

Lack of citations segment fascinating. If we were (with the help of empirical studies?) to come to the conclusion that most such studies reflected, above all, the normative baggage of the researchers, we might learn to embrace those not afraid to speak for themselves? And perhaps social science could be compared to some branches of mathematics, in which possibilities are developed on a purely theoretical or imaginative basis, and it is left to time (and capital?) to decide on their usefulness in some other "real world"? Meanwhile and perhaps naively, we are shocked, again and again, by the ...

read more... join the conversation >
Categories: Ed Mooney | Add a Comment
38085-o

“Counting” is a beautiful little Philip Larkin poem that I had not read before encountering it in a bilingual collection, with French translations: La vie avec un trou dedans. Thinking in terms of one Is easily done — One room, one bed, one chair, One person there, Makes perfect sense; one set Of wishes can […]

August 30, 2015

Buddha was overcome by the shock of disease, death, and poverty, and spoke thereafter of how one could nevertheless cope. He didn't dwell on his personal wounding experiences -- didn't seek pity. Perhaps he thought, "suffering just knocked me down; how can I ever get up as a whole human being? And I vow to generously pass on the steps in my recovery without harping on my personal wounds." Thoreau was overcome by the shock of his brother John's death, and in his first letters after that he begins the ascent out of the pit. In a way all his writing has the "central stream of what [he] feel[s...

read more... join the conversation >
Next Page »