Z e t e o
Reading, Looking, Listening, . . . Questioning
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Increasingly Zeteo contributors are focusing on the projects we call Zeteo is Reading (ZiR) and Zeteo is Looking and Listening (ZiLL). These posts—often mini-essays—call attention to and discuss texts, images, sounds, movies, bits of grafitti, and so forth that we believe worthy of greater attention and rumination. Amid the welter and din of the Web, commercial media, […]

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The theme of this issue is that of every Zeteo issue: Borders. We are interested in transgressing the borders between the personal, the political, and the intellectual, and in pieces that cross the boundaries between academic fields. This Fall 2014 issue—our largest and most unified to date—makes our interest in borders explicit, as the contributing […]

Categories: Drew Whitcup, ZiR | Add a Comment
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Writing for TheNation.com, Bruce Shapiro takes a close look at the federal death penalty in the wake of Boston Marathon bomber Dzhokhar Tsarnaev’s recent sentence: Tsarnaev was sentenced to death in a state that had abolished capital punishment 31 years ago; in a city whose residents had overwhelmingly preferred him to be imprisoned for life; […]

ZiR
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Not many young adult authors launch their novels with a poem, much less a two-page piece that transcends their target demographic. So I was surprised to find the poem below on the very first page of bestselling YA author Sarah Dessen‘s novel “That Summer.” The poem is by South Carolina author Dannye Romine Powell, an award-winning […]

ZiR
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I had the pleasure this week of visiting the Leonardo da Vinci exhibition at The Boston Museum of Fine Arts. I hadn’t been in the museum since the addition of a magnificent new wing – a light steel and glass edifice, in places nearly transparent. It contrasts robustly with the gathering steps, fluted pillars, pediment, […]

ZiR
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A Tale of Two Artists’s Careers Keith Haring (1958-1990) and Jeff Koons (1955-) were born in Pennsylvania and grew up in middle-class families. Their careers as artists took off in the 1980s, at a time when contemporary art was just beginning to be looked at seriously. It was an exciting moment. The late Marcia Tucker […]

ZiLL
Renoir Victor Chocquet

{click for pdf}   Harvard’s Fogg Museum does not think of itself as “portrait gallery”—it includes more than “just” portraits. Nonetheless, I am prepared to make the following, likely unprovable, assertion: The percentage of wonderful portraits to total number of artworks on display is greater at the Fogg than at any other museum in the […]

ZiLL
Categories: Ed Mooney, ZiR | Add a Comment
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Is self-knowledge something accomplished in solitude, mulling over our past and our life with others – something that occurs on solitary walks or looking out over the sea?  Here is a friend and fine philosopher writing about a couple’s coming to know each other:  Sarah has been veiled from Chuck for most of the time […]

ZiR
snapping turtle claws

{click for pdf}   As evening was coming on, at the end of a cove in a nature preserve, I saw in the water some dark, complex something. Two box-like shapes, attached to one another. An abandoned part of a car engine? Approaching a little closer, I saw that in fact it was two midsized, […]

ZiLL
Categories: Drew Whitcup, ZiR | Add a Comment
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The New York City trial of Pedro Hernandez ended last week in a mistrial. Mr. Hernandez was (and still is) charged with the 1979 murder of six-year-old Etan Patz, a sensational case brought back into the public eye by the defendant’s recent confession. After four months of trial (including seventeen days of jury deliberation), the […]

ZiR
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Poetry bears witness to events that surround it, sure. But it is not the news. It is not an opinion column either. It dips its slippery toe into telling, showing, and expressing so as to permit each reader to recreate the very event over and over anew and on a personal basis. Such a feat is perhaps […]

ZiR

Recent Comments

May 9, 2015

I'm thinking about my generally abysmal education in Dallas, from 1961 to 1965, seventh through tenth grades. In the tenth grade, I took biology, and now it occurs to me that not once did the teacher mention Darwin or evolution. This is entirely justifiable in terms of time: there are far too many facts about plants and animals to be crammed into students' heads and too little time in which to do it. A half century later, I doubt that anything has changed, given the state's unwillingness to encourage original thinking or to challenge parental authority. But the same excuse of too little tim...

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April 27, 2015

"The World of Yesterday" is also the title of the English translation of Stefan Zweig's memoir in which he writes, inter alia, about how "in its liberal idealism, the nineteenth century was honestly convinced that it was on the straight and unfailing path toward being the best of all worlds. . . . [I]t was merely a matter of decades until the last vestige of evil and violence would finally be conquered, and this faith in an uninterrupted and irresistible “progress” truly had the force of religion for that generation. . . . At night the dim street lights of former times were replaced by ele...

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April 15, 2015

As Philip Levine says in the Paris Review interview, he told stories in his poems. He told an interesting story at a gala farewell in New York, at Cooper Union. I think he was retiring from teaching at NYU. Several poets told stories and read poems by Levine, and finally Levine himself got up to speak and read. He read "They Feed They Lion," and the story he told about the poem was that the title was a typo. He asked his wife to read the poem, and as she read it aloud, he stopped her and said, "No, that should be 'They feed the lion.'" And his loving wife said, "No, honey, I like it the way it...

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