Z e t e o
Reading, Looking, Listening, . . . Questioning
Philip Guston, "Aggressor," 1978, private collection

Why do we think Guston made paintings like these? This becomes a question, too, about how we are compelled, how we respond.   By William Eaton   I think every good painter here in New York really paints a self-portrait. I think a painter has two choices: he paints the world or himself. And I […]

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Michelangelo Merisi da Caravaggio, Sacrificio di Isacco (The Sacrifice of Isaac), 1603. In the collection of the Uffizi Gallery, Florence.

Twenty-Three Ways (and Counting) of Looking at the Bible By Martin Green Review of Reading Genesis: Beginnings, edited by Beth Kissileff (Bloomsbury/T&T Clark, 2016)   Beth Kissileff’s recent anthology Reading Genesis: Beginnings presents twenty-three ways of looking at the first book of the Hebrew Bible. Well, perhaps not twenty-three distinct ways of reading Scripture, but […]

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Exhibition image for Jewface, Yiddish Dialect Songs of Tin Pan Alley, YIVO Institute for Jewish Research - detail from larger image

Mock Yiddish and Ethnic Parody in the Vaudeville Melting-Pot     While weary critiques of Blackface, Yellowface and Redface have become almost a Halloween tradition in their own right, “Jewface” in popular music has largely been forgotten.[1]). However, this past spring, the Center for Jewish History in New York City hosted an exhibit by the […]

ZiLL
The Ballerina and the Bull, Adbusters poster - Occupy Wall Street

Allowing the full Influx of the World Artistry mitigates disaster and keeps us alive. I mean both the artistry of the world and our individual artistry in responding to it. It’s a balancing act, a ballet on the back of a dancing bull. Artistry, incoming and outgoing, from the world and from us, gives us […]

ZiR
Photo of third suicide bomber behind Stade de France blasts - photo released by French police, 22 Nov 2015 - AFP; Getty Images

. . . though that cause was, I believe, one of the worst for which a people ever fought, and one for which there was the least excuse. I do not question, however, the sincerity of the great mass of those who were opposed to us. — U.S. Grant, writing, years later, about the Confederate […]

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Categories: Ed Mooney, ZiR | Add a Comment
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          These are preliminary notes on a tension between philosophy and friendship. They are prompted by two texts I encountered nearly in conjunction, within the passage of just a few days. The first is a remarkable passage from  Moby Dick where Ishmael, the narrator whose name echoes the Biblical figure cast […]

ZiR
“The Celebrated Jumping Frog of Calaveras County,” illustration

  A comparison with a shaggy dog tale—with “The Celebrated Jumping Frog of Calaveras County”—may help us appreciate and begin to think about an “elusive passage” in Plato’s Symposium. In Twain’s text, the narrator goes seeking news of the Reverend Leonidas W. Smiley and ends up hearing stories about an inveterate gambler named Jim Smiley. […]

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Categories: Ed Mooney, ZiR | 2 Comments
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 As Alexander Hamilton watched the French Revolution unfold, he feared in America what he saw play out in France — that the unleashing of popular passions would lead not to greater democracy but to the arrival of a tyrant, riding to power on the shoulders of the people. His public discourse consists of attacking or […]

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Categories: Drew Whitcup, ZiR | Add a Comment
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Writing for the New Republic earlier this year, Eric Segall revealed his thoughts on why replacing Justice Antonin Scalia on the Supreme Court would prove so difficult. Despite common references to the nation’s highest-ranking jurists as dispassionate analysts or mere “umpires,” Segall makes clear that in his opinion, Justices and those seeking the position are partisan […]

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Five mysteries hold the keys to the unseen: the act of love, and the birth of a baby, and the contemplation of great art, and being in the presence of death or disaster, and hearing the human voice lifted in song.                                                                              […]

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Michelangelo, Sistine Chapel, Ceiling, Lunette - Aminadab

The Treatment of Jews in Renaissance Rome and on the Sistine Chapel Ceiling By Chantal Sulkow   Introduction After the earliest stage of the cleaning of Michelangelo’s Sistine Chapel ceiling frescoes in the early 1980s, the lunettes depicting Christ’s ancestors were the first to emerge from beneath centuries’ worth of darkened layers of dirt. (Fig. […]

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The Treatment of Jews in Renaissance Rome and on the Sistine Chapel Ceiling By Chantal Sulkow   Introduction After the earliest stage of the cleaning of Michelangelo’s Sistine Chapel ceiling frescoes in the early 1980s, the lunettes depicting Christ’s ancestors were the first to emerge from beneath centuries’ worth of darkened layers of dirt. (Fig. […]

ZiR

July 21, 2016

Here is Adam Gopnick on fascisim, from the July 21 New Yorker. Gopnick doesn't shy from seeing Trump as fascist: "What all forms of fascism have in common is the glorification of the nation, and the exaggeration of its humiliations, with violence promised to its enemies, at home and abroad; the worship of power wherever it appears and whoever holds it; contempt for the rule of law and for reason; unashamed employment of repeated lies as a rhetorical strategy; and a promise of vengeance for those who feel themselves disempowered by history."

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The Treatment of Jews in Renaissance Rome and on the Sistine Chapel Ceiling By Chantal Sulkow   Introduction After the earliest stage of the cleaning of Michelangelo’s Sistine Chapel ceiling frescoes in the early 1980s, the lunettes depicting Christ’s ancestors were the first to emerge from beneath centuries’ worth of darkened layers of dirt. (Fig. […]

ZiR

July 1, 2016

"Syed was charming, believable – indeed, more than believable, impossible to credit as a cold-blooded murderer." EH? Charming people cannot be murderers?

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Michelangelo Merisi da Caravaggio, Sacrificio di Isacco (The Sacrifice of Isaac), 1603. In the collection of the Uffizi Gallery, Florence.

The Treatment of Jews in Renaissance Rome and on the Sistine Chapel Ceiling By Chantal Sulkow   Introduction After the earliest stage of the cleaning of Michelangelo’s Sistine Chapel ceiling frescoes in the early 1980s, the lunettes depicting Christ’s ancestors were the first to emerge from beneath centuries’ worth of darkened layers of dirt. (Fig. […]

Review

June 28, 2016

Earlier, Abraham was not commanded to do anything, so he could argue with God as a bystander, as it were, asking that the cities be spared. To argue with God as he was asked to climb Moriah would be to directly challenge a 'direct order' -- which he was unwilling to do. He probably did 'trudge' reluctantly -- Kierkegaard offers the absurd possibilities that he raced up the mountain, or delayed a few weeks, or said "You do it, if it means so much to you that Isaac die."

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