Z e t e o
Reading, Looking, Listening, . . . Questioning
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  As my colleagues at Zeteo, William and Steve, have already pointed out, the sorrow we feel for those who lost their lives or loved ones during the attacks in Paris and Beirut this week is unfortunately accompanied by fear that the violence will only escalate from here. That is, after all, the point of terrorism, to take the middle […]

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Categories: Tucker Cox, ZiR | 1 Comment
Camino hiker3

“Who are you?” is the question a pilgrimage demands of the pilgrim. In this case, well-known European comedic entertainer, Hape Kerkeling, author of I’m Off Then: Losing and Finding Myself on the Camino de Santiago. Herr Kerkeling walked the Camino de Francés, the most popular of many “caminos” — roads in Spanish — to the […]

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blue highways1 PS  010815

Part I  (8 January 2015) — “Podunk and Toonerville” — introduces Blue Highways In Blue Highways, author William Least Heat-Moon takes the “last exit to elsewhere” — Nameless, Tennessee or Remote, Oregon or Why, Arizona or Why Not, Mississippi, anyplace and no place. Heat-Moon’s narrative is travel writing at its best: self-discovery; observations painting a portrait […]

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blue highways1 PS  010815

Part II (15 Jan ’15) – “Last Exit to Elsewhere” – illustrates Mr. Heat-Moon’s superb writing   I was going to stay on the bent and narrow rural American two-lane, the roads to Podunk and Toonerville. Into the sticks, the boondocks, the burgs, backwaters… Into those places where you say, “My god! What if you lived […]

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Gifts of travel PS 122414

Selected authors’ observations on the “gifts of travel” Part I – Dec 25, 2014 Part II – Jan 01, 2015 On this season’s Christmas and New Year’s Day, from a few of the “classic” travel books that I reviewed in 2014, I am asking, what do some of the best travel writers, past and present, […]

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Gifts of travel PS 122414

Selected authors’ observations on the “gifts of travel” Part I – Dec 25, 2014 Part II – Jan 01, 2015 On this season’s Christmas and New Year’s Day, I have selected from a few of the twenty-five “classic” travel books that I reviewed this year. I am asking, what do some of the best travel […]

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Janus

“I reflected on why, over the years, I’d come to think of France as imbued with a ‘Janus culture,’ a nation whose world-view, like the ancient god of thresholds, managed at the same time to look back and ahead,” observes David Downie in Paris to the Pyrenees: A Skeptic Pilgrim Walks the Way of Saint James. […]

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Falling off the map1 iyer PS1

  In Falling Off the Map, renowned travel author Pico Iyer says “Lonely Places are the places that don’t fit in; the places that have no seat at our international dinner tables; the places that fall between the cracks of our tidy acronyms (EEC and OPEC, OAS and NATO).” Published in 1993, Iyer’s essays capture “moods [of countries […]

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longest road PS

  What is the unum in the American pluribus? What is the “out of many, one,” those cultural values, attitudes, customs, historical heritage and other distinctions answering the question, “What holds us together?” In The Longest Road: Overland in Search of America from Key West to the Arctic Ocean, Philip Caputo asks this question of […]

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Flaneur4 PS

In The Flâneur: A Stroll Through the Paradoxes of Paris, Edmund White dedicates his memoir to the flâneur — the ambler “who loses himself in the crowd, who has no destination and goes where caprice or curiosity directs his or her steps… in search of experience… pure, useless, raw.” Going for a stroll [in Paris]… gave […]

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TSRR1 station night PS

“Culture and history matter, values and traditions endure,” writes David Greene. In his travelogue, Midnight in Siberia: A Train Journey into the Heart of Russia, Greene shares a mature understanding and affinity for an enigmatic country. How can Russians accept the harsh reality they live in—a country with low life expectancy, rampant health problems, gaping […]

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A Syrian man holds lifeless body of his son, killed by Syrian Army, Aleppo, Syria, October 3, 2013, photo by Manu Brabo - AP

“Culture and history matter, values and traditions endure,” writes David Greene. In his travelogue, Midnight in Siberia: A Train Journey into the Heart of Russia, Greene shares a mature understanding and affinity for an enigmatic country. How can Russians accept the harsh reality they live in—a country with low life expectancy, rampant health problems, gaping […]

ZiR

February 8, 2017

How does the slogan “man is a wolf to man” fit in with your later, somewhat hopeful image of camaraderie in the class struggle? I mean, if your starting assessment of human nature is correct, then doesn’t the class struggle actually come down to one group of savage beasts fighting another, the exploited class merely comprising those wolves with less opportunity to express their lupine ferocity? And don’t the exploiters no less than the exploited regularly turn against one another, so that besides the strife of classes, there is also the strife of each wolf against every other wolf? Wha...

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Beyoncé

“Culture and history matter, values and traditions endure,” writes David Greene. In his travelogue, Midnight in Siberia: A Train Journey into the Heart of Russia, Greene shares a mature understanding and affinity for an enigmatic country. How can Russians accept the harsh reality they live in—a country with low life expectancy, rampant health problems, gaping […]

Article

December 13, 2016

Any doubts I may have had have been thoroughly quashed.

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Bakewell on Sartre: “Of course, he was monstrous. He was self-indulgent, demanding, bad-tempered. … I disagree with quite a lot in Sartre. But then there is the question of ‘character’—and Sartre is full of character. He bursts out on side sides with energy, peculiarity, generosity, and communicativeness.”

“Culture and history matter, values and traditions endure,” writes David Greene. In his travelogue, Midnight in Siberia: A Train Journey into the Heart of Russia, Greene shares a mature understanding and affinity for an enigmatic country. How can Russians accept the harsh reality they live in—a country with low life expectancy, rampant health problems, gaping […]

Review

November 29, 2016

What a nice review ! I've read Bakewell and admire her courage and skill in mixing biography and philosophy in such an attractive way -- and I admire your skill in presenting the figures and themes of existentialism in an equally attractive way ! Mazel tov !

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