Z e t e o
Reading, Looking, Listening, . . . Questioning

Of course, [pornography and poetry] probably benefit [from the Internet] for different reasons: pornography because people really want it a lot but are embarrassed to go get it in person; poetry because people don’t want it that much, so it helps if they can get it for free without ever even leaving their desk chairs. […]

ZiR
Categories: ZiR | Add a Comment

Who is Steven Seagal? A few years back, I was visiting Las Vegas with a friend. While waiting in the ticket line for the aquarium at Mandalay Bay, my friend nudged me and whispered, “Look! Heather, it’s Steven Seagal.” Having no idea who that was, I replied, not loudly but not whispering either, “Who is […]

ZiR
Categories: Ed Mooney, ZiR | 3 Comments

Images have impact! In my previous post, Zeteo 10/04, I considered Rilke’s poem “The Archaic Torso of Apollo,” where the poet conjures the image of a broken statue of Apollo as he views it in a museum. He traces the impact as his eyes follow the contours of the god’s torso. The image — what […]

ZiR
Categories: Ed Mooney, ZiR | Add a Comment

And have you changed your life? A while back, in Zeteo 9/20, prompted by some remarks of E. O. Wilson, I wondered about the human need for epic, perhaps a religious epic, with roots in the Darwinian saga of creation. An epic or saga appears on a big screen. If we are concerned for the […]

ZiR

Poems can sometimes behave like short stories, like very short stories. They set the scene, bring the reader in and then leave them with an uncertain longing. In just fifteen lines, the poem below tells the story of two couples, of neighbors, of marriage, of winter. The title lets the reader know what to expect […]

ZiR
Categories: ZiR | Add a Comment

Everything after aches river & bones & the unsaid naming itself endlessly. He comes to me in dreams, and I reach for needle & thread to close the tear at his knee. This morning I found ants in the saltshaker, a pattern repeated in new snow peppered with black walnuts. I confess, with my tongue […]

ZiR
Categories: Ed Mooney, ZiR | Add a Comment

How many in Los Angeles will care about the legacy of Martin Heidegger? Fans of the American film writer and director Terrence Malick might care, but they’re unlikely to live in LA. Malick translated Heidegger as a Harvard philosophy graduate student, and traces can be found in his films. LA fans of The Los Angles […]

ZiR

sometimes I forget what country I’m in I could write poems in bed I think have some Americans look at your awful mov- ie to tell you when you’re wrong & just racist. I got this bug bite that could be anything. — the opening lines of Dissolution, by Eileen Myles[1]   The August 24 […]

ZiR

Juan Felipe Herrera’s story is a nice one. Born in California in 1948, he grew up picking crops with his migrant worker parents in the San Joaquin and Salinas Valleys.  After graduating from San Diego High School, Herrera went on to complete degrees at UCLA, Stanford and the prestigious University of Iowa Writers’ Workshop. He has […]

ZiR
Categories: Ed Mooney, ZiR | Add a Comment

I’ve just received a collection of essays on nature that includes exchanges among academics allied with ecology, literature, and theology. What caught my eye was an essay titled, “Dream Writing.” It reminds me of Thoreau’s phrase, “dreaming awake.” That’s what it was to look skyward from his skiff in the center of Walden Pond. The […]

ZiR
Categories: ZiR | Add a Comment

Over the past few weeks, I’ve been pondering these lines from the poem Going Back, which was written in Catalan by Gemma Gorga; translated to English by poet, linguist, and translator Anna Crowe; and published in Six Catalan Poets (Arc Publications, 2013). This poem might be one of those rare gems that transcends those large […]

ZiR

Recent Comments

Categories: Review | Add a Comment
Arabian Red Fox, photograph by Jem Babbington, appears on Birds of Saudi Arabia website

Over the past few weeks, I’ve been pondering these lines from the poem Going Back, which was written in Catalan by Gemma Gorga; translated to English by poet, linguist, and translator Anna Crowe; and published in Six Catalan Poets (Arc Publications, 2013). This poem might be one of those rare gems that transcends those large […]

Review

July 25, 2017

[…] Gun. Pour ses explorations des traductions, vers le français, de la poésie, voir, par example, Translating Dickinson, Poetry as Conversation, et Dylan, Nobel, Paris, Chimes Flashing. Some readers may also find of […]

read more... join the conversation >
Categories: Review | Add a Comment
Arabian Red Fox, photograph by Jem Babbington, appears on Birds of Saudi Arabia website

Over the past few weeks, I’ve been pondering these lines from the poem Going Back, which was written in Catalan by Gemma Gorga; translated to English by poet, linguist, and translator Anna Crowe; and published in Six Catalan Poets (Arc Publications, 2013). This poem might be one of those rare gems that transcends those large […]

Review

July 25, 2017

[…] Sex, Politics—is due out in 2017. His previous, Emily-Dickinson-related, multilingual writing: Translating Dickinson (into French) and Dickinson — Sex, Spanish, Stew. Some readers might also be interested in Beyond […]

read more... join the conversation >
Categories: Essay | Add a Comment

Over the past few weeks, I’ve been pondering these lines from the poem Going Back, which was written in Catalan by Gemma Gorga; translated to English by poet, linguist, and translator Anna Crowe; and published in Six Catalan Poets (Arc Publications, 2013). This poem might be one of those rare gems that transcends those large […]

Essay

July 23, 2017

[…] my proposition that a life so lived, so noticing, is a fuller life, a life more zoomed in—see On Savoring, Zeteo, December […]

read more... join the conversation >
« Previous PageNext Page »