Z e t e o
Reading, Looking, Listening, . . . Questioning

Memorable lines from William Blake: Twofold, twofold always May God us keep From single vision And Newton’s sleep       Imagination lets us see the world as other than a Newtonian assembly of spinning atoms (updated to Quarks), or as a Darwinian stage for Fitter-gene transmissions, or as a Brainy locus for neurological pathways. […]

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                                                       Bakhtin coined the term “carnivalesque’ to mark literary works with multiple, contrasting, and forever-competing centers of gravity. These paintings above have multiple, contrasting, and forever-competing centers of gravity. They’re done by someone new in my world, Octavio Ocampo. These images […]

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  Richard Dawkins’ head is fizzing with mad thoughts.. . .  Outside a shimmering band of turquoise near the horizon brings a soft sparkle to the beads of dew hanging from trees in early bud; the heavy clouds in the distance look peach-pink and insubstantial; so do the old pale brick houses that line his […]

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Last week, I attended the Technology, Privacy, and the Future of Education symposium at NYU’s Media, Culture, and Communication department. One panelist, NYU Sociology’s Richard Arum, addressed the impact of technology on education-as-vocation—a subject on which I recommend Sugata Mitra’s self-organized, child-driven pedagogy. The other panelists focused primarily on digital technology’s impact on educational administration. […]

ZiLL

  It turns out that a runaway best-seller in Germany is a local forest ranger’s book about the communal life of trees. The Hidden Life of Trees will appear in English translation next fall. Trees help each other out. If their limbs block a neighbor’s light, they’ll sometimes lean away, and many trees do better […]

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I was startled to read in yesterday’s Boston Globe that a scholarly paper on “the God particle” (the Higgs boson) had 5,154 authors. I wondered if they hired a stadium for the signing and celebration. I usually think of science as dancing with poetry. An odd couple, you’ll say, but I’ve learned from Thoreau that […]

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Categories: Fritz Tucker, ZiR | Add a Comment

While reading Suketu Mehta’s Maximum City: Bombay Lost and Found, I came across a most thought-provoking passage on Bollywood, which applies to Hollywood as well. On pg. 348, Mehta writes (emphasis mine): Gangsters and whores all over the world have always been fascinated by the movies and vice versa; the movies are fundamentally transgressive. They are […]

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Categories: Ed Mooney | 2 Comments

  Herman Melville was mesmerized by a mysterious white whale. A new movie in town, In the Heart of the Sea, recounts the more or less true story of a whale ramming a ship in 1820. The Essex from Nantucket was stove in, in the South Pacific. Moby Dick is a distant relative of that […]

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In a tree outside my kitchen window, they built their nest: the male cardinal in brilliant scarlet, the female, a subdued reddish brown. For days they labored, ferrying bits of pine needles, twigs, and leaves to a chosen spot in the middle, buried within the green. “Tree” is perhaps not entirely accurate, as it lacked […]

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Categories: Fritz Tucker, ZiR | Add a Comment

Perhaps Jane Jacobs’ most acclaimed contribution to urban studies in The Death and Life of Great American Cities is her “eyes on the street” theory. “[T]here must be eyes upon the street, eyes belonging to those we might call the natural proprietors of the street . . . to insure the safety of both residents and strangers” (1992, […]

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Categories: Ed Mooney, ZiR | 7 Comments

In every true searcher of Nature 
there is a kind of religious reverence — Albert Einstein. In his recent Zeteo post, Drew Whitcup cites a New Yorker polemic by Lawrence Krauss, who posits a necessary conflict between science and religion. But the emergence of modern science is inconceivable without the ancient and medieval assumptions of […]

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Categories: Review | 7 Comments
Arabian Red Fox, photograph by Jem Babbington, appears on Birds of Saudi Arabia website

In every true searcher of Nature 
there is a kind of religious reverence — Albert Einstein. In his recent Zeteo post, Drew Whitcup cites a New Yorker polemic by Lawrence Krauss, who posits a necessary conflict between science and religion. But the emergence of modern science is inconceivable without the ancient and medieval assumptions of […]

Review

July 25, 2017

[…] Gun. Pour ses explorations des traductions, vers le français, de la poésie, voir, par example, Translating Dickinson, Poetry as Conversation, et Dylan, Nobel, Paris, Chimes Flashing. Some readers may also find of […]

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Categories: Review | 7 Comments
Arabian Red Fox, photograph by Jem Babbington, appears on Birds of Saudi Arabia website

In every true searcher of Nature 
there is a kind of religious reverence — Albert Einstein. In his recent Zeteo post, Drew Whitcup cites a New Yorker polemic by Lawrence Krauss, who posits a necessary conflict between science and religion. But the emergence of modern science is inconceivable without the ancient and medieval assumptions of […]

Review

July 25, 2017

[…] Sex, Politics—is due out in 2017. His previous, Emily-Dickinson-related, multilingual writing: Translating Dickinson (into French) and Dickinson — Sex, Spanish, Stew. Some readers might also be interested in Beyond […]

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Categories: Essay | 7 Comments

In every true searcher of Nature 
there is a kind of religious reverence — Albert Einstein. In his recent Zeteo post, Drew Whitcup cites a New Yorker polemic by Lawrence Krauss, who posits a necessary conflict between science and religion. But the emergence of modern science is inconceivable without the ancient and medieval assumptions of […]

Essay

July 23, 2017

[…] my proposition that a life so lived, so noticing, is a fuller life, a life more zoomed in—see On Savoring, Zeteo, December […]

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