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Reading, Looking, Listening, . . . Questioning
Categories: Tucker Cox, ZiR | 1 Comment

Part I – “Australia’s curious sense of disconnectedness” is about the Aussie people, a “beguiling fusion of America and Britain” – 11 Sept 2014 Part II – “It is an environment that wants your dead”  – Bryson writes about his travels through the Australian Outback – 18 Sept 2014   They are “unaccountably overlooked,” in […]

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Categories: Tucker Cox, ZiR | 2 Comments

Part I – “Australia’s curious sense of disconnectedness” is about the Aussie people, a “beguiling fusion of America and Britain” – 11 Sept 2014 Part III – “Unaccountably overlooked and packed with unappreciated wonders” – is about Aborigines, earth’s oldest culture and stromatolites – earth’s oldest life form – 25 Sept 2014 In a Sunburned Country, Bill […]

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Categories: Tucker Cox, ZiR | 3 Comments

Part II – “It is an environment that wants your dead”  – Bryson writes about his travels through the Australian Outback – 18 Sept 2014 Part III – “Unaccountably overlooked and packed with unappreciated wonders” – is about Aborigines, earth’s oldest culture and stromatolites – earth’s oldest life form – 25 Sept   In a […]

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In the canon of travel literature, few books match The Travels of Sir John Mandeville. The tales of his journey are the tallest, many pure fantasy. His book – also called The Book of Marvels and Travels – was one of “the most popular in Medieval Europe.,” available in English, Latin, French, German, and other tongues. Few […]

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Part 1 is introduces the Silk Road, the world’s best known itinerary Read part 2 (21 Aug) about the Road’s ethnic diversity ranging from Europe to Korea   “Magic clung about it always. The earliest silk – the Indians called it woven wind – was sheer as gauze.” Colin Thubron’s splendid travelogue, Shadow of the Silk Road, […]

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Categories: Tucker Cox, ZiR | 2 Comments

Part 1 is introduces the Silk Road, the world’s best known itinerary Part 3 (28 Aug) discusses Thubron’s journey through Afghanistan and Iran, ending in Turkey Colin Thubron’s travelogue, Shadow of the Silk Road, is pure joy. His descriptions are vivid. They are alive. His natural and spontaneous metaphors and similes have immediate impact. His prose runs effortlessly. […]

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Categories: Tucker Cox, ZiR | 2 Comments

Read part 2 (21 Aug) about the Road’s ethnic diversity ranging from Europe to Korea Part 3 (28 Aug) discusses Thubron’s journey through Afghanistan and Iran, ending in Turkey   Colin Thubron’s Shadow of the Silk Road records his 7,000 mile journey from Xi’an China to Antioch, Turkey (today Antaky). Thubron is a peerless author of travel books. The […]

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After drifting on slabs of pack ice for five months, escaping in small open boats when the rising temperature at last did its job and finally, after 16 months of living on the ocean, Sir Ernest Shackleton’s crew landed on Elephant Island, Antarctica. “The accomplishment of another stage of the homeward journey” boosted morale, prompting […]

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“The acute pain of solitude experienced at first never returned” to Capt. Joshua Slocum, author of the quintessential travelogue, Sailing Alone Around the World. I met Neptune in his wrath, but he found that I had not treated him with contempt, and so he suffered me to go on and explore. Slocum left Boston on April 24, […]

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Categories: Tucker Cox, ZiR | 1 Comment

The second of two reviews. See part I – click here In Pictures from Italy, Charles Dickens’ description of Napolitanos doing “everything in pantomime” illustrates his unsurpassed skill at animating a scene: …beggars rap their chins with their right hands… the conventional sign for hunger. A man quarrelling with another lays the palm of his […]

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This is part I of II, contrasting Dickens’ and Goethe’s images of Italy. Part II discusses sightseeing along Dickens’ itinerary – click here    A rousing contrast exists between Charles Dickens’ Pictures from Italy and Goethe’s Italian journey reviewed last week. Goethe says, “I am not here to enjoy myself… but to improve.” Dickens is on vacation. His […]

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This is part I of II, contrasting Dickens’ and Goethe’s images of Italy. Part II discusses sightseeing along Dickens’ itinerary – click here    A rousing contrast exists between Charles Dickens’ Pictures from Italy and Goethe’s Italian journey reviewed last week. Goethe says, “I am not here to enjoy myself… but to improve.” Dickens is on vacation. His […]

ZiR

July 26, 2018

A point of information... This book was translated as "A Fortnight in the Wilderness" and included as Appendix 2 in "Democracy In America: Historical-Critical Edition", edited by Eduardo Nolla. There this amazing text can be read in full. It is worth comparing the translation by James Schleifer to your own. In particular, the rendering of "désert" to "wilderness" is most intriguing.

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This is part I of II, contrasting Dickens’ and Goethe’s images of Italy. Part II discusses sightseeing along Dickens’ itinerary – click here    A rousing contrast exists between Charles Dickens’ Pictures from Italy and Goethe’s Italian journey reviewed last week. Goethe says, “I am not here to enjoy myself… but to improve.” Dickens is on vacation. His […]

ZiR

July 26, 2018

Thanks so much for this translation and excellent analysis.

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This is part I of II, contrasting Dickens’ and Goethe’s images of Italy. Part II discusses sightseeing along Dickens’ itinerary – click here    A rousing contrast exists between Charles Dickens’ Pictures from Italy and Goethe’s Italian journey reviewed last week. Goethe says, “I am not here to enjoy myself… but to improve.” Dickens is on vacation. His […]

ZiR

July 16, 2018

Thanks a lot, Steve. And, continuing the segue-ing, here's an old (and traditional) Gary Snyder poem I just came across yesterday: Seaman’s Ditty I’m wondering where you are now Married, or mad, or free: Wherever you are you’re likely glad, But memory troubles me. We could’ve had us children, We could’ve had a home— But you thought not, and I thought not, And these nine years we roam. Today I worked in the deep dark tanks, And climbed out to watch the sea: Gulls and salty waves pass by, And mountains of Araby. I’ve travelled the lonely oceans And wandered the...

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