Z e t e o
Reading, Looking, Listening, . . . Questioning
aging

Two weeks ago I came across a book titled How to Age as I strolled through the snowy streets of Brooklyn. The book, written by Anne Karpf, criticized people’s fear of aging and promoted advanced adulthood as a nurturing life stage. To illustrate negative views of aging, Karpf used an exhibit at the Boston Museum of Science in 2000 as […]

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Frontera14

Daniel Maldonado {Note: This is the last in Zeteo‘s Fall 2014 series of pieces related to borders.} LA FRONTERA: Artists along the US-Mexican Border Photographs by Stefan Falke, with captions by Stefan Falke and Alexia Raynal   Stefan Falke, a German photographer who lives in New York, has been visiting again and again the cities and […]

Article
Boko Haram

Earlier this month, UK-based researcher Mark Hay wrote about the press’ lack of interest in Boko Haram’s most recent massacre. But rather than being downright condemning, Hay wrote analytically. While acknowledging the influence of racism and Western views of Africa on this matter, the writer points out to a much larger lack of sympathy for those with whom we fail to […]

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Borders_3

The Physical and Psychological Journeys that the Children of Immigrants Make for their Families By Alexia Raynal Click here for PDF version. {Note: This is the sixth in Zeteo‘s Fall 2014 series of pieces related to borders, the borders here being between countries, between families, and between generations.}   One summer morning about two years ago, as […]

Article
Tonatiuh 1

Alexia Raynal is heading home for the holidays. Her commentary in the fields of children and childhood will return next year. Wish her luck as she tries to keep her hands off the keyboard! From Duncan Tonatiuh’s book Dear Primo: A Letter to My Cousin. Watch him read the stories of two cousins—Carlos and Charlie—about their lives across borders […]

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Ronald McDonald and Boy, arms spread, Christ-like

How the food industry limits children’s healthy choices I first heard about Fed Up—a documentary about obesity in the United States—when a review by The Huffington Post made it to my news feed last week. In the article, Corinna Clendenen addresses the documentary’s stories of children’s struggles to lose weight. She is not entirely convinced about the health facts in it, but […]

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look back 1

Last morning, as I skimmed through my favorite books, I bumped into Marjorie Orellana’s Translating Childhoods: Immigrant Youth, Language, and Culture. I had not picked up the book since last year, but it was easy to remember why I like it so much. While speaking mostly about children’s work as translators for their monolingual parents, Orellana also dedicates a brief section […]

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obama ambivalence

(Towards Migrants and Migration Acts) Many liberals and human rights advocates supported president Obama’s executive action on immigration last week. Many others, however, are ambivalent about their take on this act. Should we protect families even if parents are undocumented? While the response is obvious to me (yes), I take this ambivalence as a healthy sign of thoughtfulness and change. […]

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deportation

On Saturday, the Los Angeles Times published an opinion piece by Diane Guerrero, the Colombian actress who plays Maritza Ramos in “Orange Is the New Black.” It tells the story of how Guerrero lost her parents to deportation when she was barely 14, starting with her worst fears growing up: Throughout my childhood I watched my parents try to become […]

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super hero makes us

In an article titled “Studying Children: Phenomenological Insights” (1986), sociologist Frances Waksler complained about people not taking children seriously. She wanted others to see that children’s actions can “constrain, facilitate, encourage and in myriad ways have implications for others, adults in particular.” To illustrate her point, Waksler provided the following example: Adults are known to “make” children eat […]

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tiles 2

A day off is a day in French and Portuguese Please excuse me as I “take a break” from reading about how we look at children. Here, an excerpt and accompanying images from an illustrated book I was recently given. The book is called “Le Chat Bleu du Palais Fronteira/O Gato Azul do Palácio Fronteira,” and […]

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Recent Comments

A Syrian man holds lifeless body of his son, killed by Syrian Army, Aleppo, Syria, October 3, 2013, photo by Manu Brabo - AP

A day off is a day in French and Portuguese Please excuse me as I “take a break” from reading about how we look at children. Here, an excerpt and accompanying images from an illustrated book I was recently given. The book is called “Le Chat Bleu du Palais Fronteira/O Gato Azul do Palácio Fronteira,” and […]

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February 8, 2017

How does the slogan “man is a wolf to man” fit in with your later, somewhat hopeful image of camaraderie in the class struggle? I mean, if your starting assessment of human nature is correct, then doesn’t the class struggle actually come down to one group of savage beasts fighting another, the exploited class merely comprising those wolves with less opportunity to express their lupine ferocity? And don’t the exploiters no less than the exploited regularly turn against one another, so that besides the strife of classes, there is also the strife of each wolf against every other wolf? Wha...

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Beyoncé

A day off is a day in French and Portuguese Please excuse me as I “take a break” from reading about how we look at children. Here, an excerpt and accompanying images from an illustrated book I was recently given. The book is called “Le Chat Bleu du Palais Fronteira/O Gato Azul do Palácio Fronteira,” and […]

Article

December 13, 2016

Any doubts I may have had have been thoroughly quashed.

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Bakewell on Sartre: “Of course, he was monstrous. He was self-indulgent, demanding, bad-tempered. … I disagree with quite a lot in Sartre. But then there is the question of ‘character’—and Sartre is full of character. He bursts out on side sides with energy, peculiarity, generosity, and communicativeness.”

A day off is a day in French and Portuguese Please excuse me as I “take a break” from reading about how we look at children. Here, an excerpt and accompanying images from an illustrated book I was recently given. The book is called “Le Chat Bleu du Palais Fronteira/O Gato Azul do Palácio Fronteira,” and […]

Review

November 29, 2016

What a nice review ! I've read Bakewell and admire her courage and skill in mixing biography and philosophy in such an attractive way -- and I admire your skill in presenting the figures and themes of existentialism in an equally attractive way ! Mazel tov !

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