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Reading, Looking, Listening, . . . Questioning

  As my colleagues at Zeteo, William and Steve, have already pointed out, the sorrow we feel for those who lost their lives or loved ones during the attacks in Paris and Beirut this week is unfortunately accompanied by fear that the violence will only escalate from here. That is, after all, the point of terrorism, to take the middle […]

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Part I  (8 January 2015) — “Podunk and Toonerville” — introduces Blue Highways In Blue Highways, author William Least Heat-Moon takes the “last exit to elsewhere” — Nameless, Tennessee or Remote, Oregon or Why, Arizona or Why Not, Mississippi, anyplace and no place. Heat-Moon’s narrative is travel writing at its best: self-discovery; observations painting a portrait […]

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Part II (15 Jan ’15) – “Last Exit to Elsewhere” – illustrates Mr. Heat-Moon’s superb writing   I was going to stay on the bent and narrow rural American two-lane, the roads to Podunk and Toonerville. Into the sticks, the boondocks, the burgs, backwaters… Into those places where you say, “My god! What if you lived […]

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Selected authors’ observations on the “gifts of travel” Part I – Dec 25, 2014 Part II – Jan 01, 2015 On this season’s Christmas and New Year’s Day, from a few of the “classic” travel books that I reviewed in 2014, I am asking, what do some of the best travel writers, past and present, […]

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Selected authors’ observations on the “gifts of travel” Part I – Dec 25, 2014 Part II – Jan 01, 2015 On this season’s Christmas and New Year’s Day, I have selected from a few of the twenty-five “classic” travel books that I reviewed this year. I am asking, what do some of the best travel […]

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“I reflected on why, over the years, I’d come to think of France as imbued with a ‘Janus culture,’ a nation whose world-view, like the ancient god of thresholds, managed at the same time to look back and ahead,” observes David Downie in Paris to the Pyrenees: A Skeptic Pilgrim Walks the Way of Saint James. […]

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  In Falling Off the Map, renowned travel author Pico Iyer says “Lonely Places are the places that don’t fit in; the places that have no seat at our international dinner tables; the places that fall between the cracks of our tidy acronyms (EEC and OPEC, OAS and NATO).” Published in 1993, Iyer’s essays capture “moods [of countries […]

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  What is the unum in the American pluribus? What is the “out of many, one,” those cultural values, attitudes, customs, historical heritage and other distinctions answering the question, “What holds us together?” In The Longest Road: Overland in Search of America from Key West to the Arctic Ocean, Philip Caputo asks this question of […]

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In The Flâneur: A Stroll Through the Paradoxes of Paris, Edmund White dedicates his memoir to the flâneur — the ambler “who loses himself in the crowd, who has no destination and goes where caprice or curiosity directs his or her steps… in search of experience… pure, useless, raw.” Going for a stroll [in Paris]… gave […]

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“Culture and history matter, values and traditions endure,” writes David Greene. In his travelogue, Midnight in Siberia: A Train Journey into the Heart of Russia, Greene shares a mature understanding and affinity for an enigmatic country. How can Russians accept the harsh reality they live in—a country with low life expectancy, rampant health problems, gaping […]

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The Wander Year is Mike McIntyre’s memoir of his and longtime girlfriend, Andrea Boyles’ year of travel. In 2000, McIntyre, then 42, and Boyles, 40, covered 22 countries on 6 continents. They crossed the equator 6 times, took 45 flights and slept in 169 beds “plus one sand dune.” The trip cost $51,470. We’ve penciled in an […]

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Arabian Red Fox, photograph by Jem Babbington, appears on Birds of Saudi Arabia website

The Wander Year is Mike McIntyre’s memoir of his and longtime girlfriend, Andrea Boyles’ year of travel. In 2000, McIntyre, then 42, and Boyles, 40, covered 22 countries on 6 continents. They crossed the equator 6 times, took 45 flights and slept in 169 beds “plus one sand dune.” The trip cost $51,470. We’ve penciled in an […]

Review

July 25, 2017

[…] Gun. Pour ses explorations des traductions, vers le français, de la poésie, voir, par example, Translating Dickinson, Poetry as Conversation, et Dylan, Nobel, Paris, Chimes Flashing. Some readers may also find of […]

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Categories: Review | 1 Comment
Arabian Red Fox, photograph by Jem Babbington, appears on Birds of Saudi Arabia website

The Wander Year is Mike McIntyre’s memoir of his and longtime girlfriend, Andrea Boyles’ year of travel. In 2000, McIntyre, then 42, and Boyles, 40, covered 22 countries on 6 continents. They crossed the equator 6 times, took 45 flights and slept in 169 beds “plus one sand dune.” The trip cost $51,470. We’ve penciled in an […]

Review

July 25, 2017

[…] Sex, Politics—is due out in 2017. His previous, Emily-Dickinson-related, multilingual writing: Translating Dickinson (into French) and Dickinson — Sex, Spanish, Stew. Some readers might also be interested in Beyond […]

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Categories: Essay | 1 Comment

The Wander Year is Mike McIntyre’s memoir of his and longtime girlfriend, Andrea Boyles’ year of travel. In 2000, McIntyre, then 42, and Boyles, 40, covered 22 countries on 6 continents. They crossed the equator 6 times, took 45 flights and slept in 169 beds “plus one sand dune.” The trip cost $51,470. We’ve penciled in an […]

Essay

July 23, 2017

[…] my proposition that a life so lived, so noticing, is a fuller life, a life more zoomed in—see On Savoring, Zeteo, December […]

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