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Reading, Looking, Listening, . . . Questioning
Categories: Drew Whitcup, ZiR | Add a Comment

Armed activists took over a small government building in Oregon this weekend, eliciting mostly negative reactions from left-leaning commentators who have (quite fairly) pointed out a number of inconsistencies in the so-called militia’s message. More troubling still has been the notable difference in how the Oregon protesters are being treated compared to, say, members of […]

ZiR
Categories: Fritz Tucker, ZiLL | 1 Comment

Shortly after posting my previous week’s article about Donald Trump, fascism, and communal violence, the New York Times published footage of a woman being lynched in Kabul, Afghanistan. The preceding disclaimer did not prepare me for the video’s contents; though I can’t think of anything that would have. It was definitely the worst thing I’ve ever seen […]

ZiLL
Categories: Ed Mooney, ZiR | Add a Comment

Nothing is more fascinating — and frustrating to others — than our capacity to manipulate the image or story we present to others. In an acute way this capacity to pretend or impersonate raises the question of who we are beneath public appearances. The clash between public appearance and underlying reality plays into the hands […]

ZiR
Categories: Drew Whitcup, ZiR | 1 Comment

Across many professional realms, unions provide critical protections for vulnerable citizens. Those of us aligned with the political left decry most efforts to undermine the power of collective bargaining. The police, however, represent a notable exception. Writing earlier this month for the New Republic, Steven Cohen describes the sometimes disastrous effect of police union protections. He […]

ZiR
Categories: Fritz Tucker, ZiLL | 1 Comment

Seemingly every statement regarding Donald Trump in recent weeks either explicitly or implicitly compares him to Hitler. It’s almost as though both social and mainstream media are trying to pay homage to Godwin’s Law, which humorously and tautologically states that any online discussion will eventually compare the subject to Nazi Germany. These comparisons highlight both the capacity and limitation of the American imagination. For these […]

ZiLL
Categories: Drew Whitcup, ZiR | Add a Comment
US Supreme Court building, Washington, DC

Writing for Slate.com, Dahlia Lithwick discusses the case of Evenwel v. Abbott, which was argued yesterday in the US Supreme Court. Lithwick sums up the competing positions: In the plainest sense, Evenwel v. Abbott simply asks the court to determine whether states—in this case Texas—should apportion legislative districts by counting the total population (as determined through the census) or the […]

ZiR

  As my colleagues at Zeteo, William and Steve, have already pointed out, the sorrow we feel for those who lost their lives or loved ones during the attacks in Paris and Beirut this week is unfortunately accompanied by fear that the violence will only escalate from here. That is, after all, the point of terrorism, to take the middle […]

ZiLL
Categories: Ed Mooney, ZiR | 3 Comments

This post was largely finished before the Paris terror attacks. I criticized costumes that mock and mimic violence, writing, that these outfits “cut too close to the bone.” Those words of mid-week cut even deeper now. ♦ Halloween is over, but Fall Football isn’t. In his magisterial A Secular Age (45-6), Charles Taylor writes that […]

ZiR
Categories: Ed Mooney, ZiR | Add a Comment

Is atmosphere important? — Can I control breeze? I usually leave political observation to one side, but today was my first voting experience in my newly adopted state, Maine, and it was distinctive and instructive. But before I get to the voting, let me pause on the place, pass on some impressions of the atmosphere. […]

ZiR
Categories: Fritz Tucker, ZiR | 1 Comment

In Dancing in the Streets: A History of Collective Joy (Holt Paperbacks, 2007), Barbara Ehrenreich writes about the evolution of carnivals; from tribal societies masking and dancing to manufacture group solidarity (Intro, Ch. 1); to feudal festivals that challenged oppressive gender and class relations (Ch. 4). Writes Ehrenreich: Whatever social category you had been boxed into–male or female, rich […]

ZiR

  If now largely ignored, Alain Tanner and John Berger’s 1976 film Jonas qui aura 25 ans en l’an 2000 (For Jonas Who Will Be 25 In The Year 2000), remains warm, charming, lovable.[1] And the movie is particularly hard not to like now when the hopes and “Marxist humanist” analysis underlying it have come […]

ZiLL

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Categories: Review | Add a Comment
Arabian Red Fox, photograph by Jem Babbington, appears on Birds of Saudi Arabia website

  If now largely ignored, Alain Tanner and John Berger’s 1976 film Jonas qui aura 25 ans en l’an 2000 (For Jonas Who Will Be 25 In The Year 2000), remains warm, charming, lovable.[1] And the movie is particularly hard not to like now when the hopes and “Marxist humanist” analysis underlying it have come […]

Review

July 25, 2017

[…] Gun. Pour ses explorations des traductions, vers le français, de la poésie, voir, par example, Translating Dickinson, Poetry as Conversation, et Dylan, Nobel, Paris, Chimes Flashing. Some readers may also find of […]

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Categories: Review | Add a Comment
Arabian Red Fox, photograph by Jem Babbington, appears on Birds of Saudi Arabia website

  If now largely ignored, Alain Tanner and John Berger’s 1976 film Jonas qui aura 25 ans en l’an 2000 (For Jonas Who Will Be 25 In The Year 2000), remains warm, charming, lovable.[1] And the movie is particularly hard not to like now when the hopes and “Marxist humanist” analysis underlying it have come […]

Review

July 25, 2017

[…] Sex, Politics—is due out in 2017. His previous, Emily-Dickinson-related, multilingual writing: Translating Dickinson (into French) and Dickinson — Sex, Spanish, Stew. Some readers might also be interested in Beyond […]

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Categories: Essay | Add a Comment

  If now largely ignored, Alain Tanner and John Berger’s 1976 film Jonas qui aura 25 ans en l’an 2000 (For Jonas Who Will Be 25 In The Year 2000), remains warm, charming, lovable.[1] And the movie is particularly hard not to like now when the hopes and “Marxist humanist” analysis underlying it have come […]

Essay

July 23, 2017

[…] my proposition that a life so lived, so noticing, is a fuller life, a life more zoomed in—see On Savoring, Zeteo, December […]

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