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Reading, Looking, Listening, . . . Questioning
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Bust portrait of a young man representing the nativist ideal of the Know Nothing party, from Harp Week collection of American political prints, 1766-1876

“I Know Nothing”: Faith, Fear, and Politics in Antebellum America By Emily Sosolik   Let our opponents torture and distort the truth as they may, no specious reasoning, no political sophistry can alter the fact that those who are constantly laboring to fight down Americanism and Protestantism are enemies of their country, and tories or […]

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Stanching the Flow   By Martin Green   The emergence of immigration as a major issue worldwide and especially in the presidential campaign—thanks to Donald Trump’s vociferous attack on alleged rapists, drug dealers, and other criminals sneaking across the southern border, to say nothing of the threat posed by terrorists hiding among Moslem refugees—is not, […]

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Categories: Fritz Tucker, ZiLL | 1 Comment

Seemingly every statement regarding Donald Trump in recent weeks either explicitly or implicitly compares him to Hitler. It’s almost as though both social and mainstream media are trying to pay homage to Godwin’s Law, which humorously and tautologically states that any online discussion will eventually compare the subject to Nazi Germany. These comparisons highlight both the capacity and limitation of the American imagination. For these […]

ZiLL
Categories: William Eaton, ZiR | 5 Comments

Out of the hundred million people living in Soviet Russia, we should be able get 90 million behind us. The others, there’s no talking with them, they have to be annihilated. — Bolshevik leader Grigory Zinoviev, September 1918   Results. Approximately 245 000 deaths in the United States in [the year] 2000 were attributable to low […]

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  As my colleagues at Zeteo, William and Steve, have already pointed out, the sorrow we feel for those who lost their lives or loved ones during the attacks in Paris and Beirut this week is unfortunately accompanied by fear that the violence will only escalate from here. That is, after all, the point of terrorism, to take the middle […]

ZiLL
Categories: Drew Whitcup, ZiR | Add a Comment

Continuing to read Matt Taibbi’s The Divide: American Injustice in the Age of the Wealth Gap, I find myself looping back and rereading certain portions. The point of the book—and it’s far from subtly presented—is to show the contrast between the way our nation treats poor people charged with crimes and the way it treats those Taibbi […]

ZiR

Qallunaat! Why White People Are Funny by Mark Sandiford, National Film Board of Canada  I just watched a great film, Qallunaat! Why White People are Funny, an anthropological study of White people featuring the Inuit writer Zebedee Nungak. He begins: We Inuit are deeply fascinated by Qallunaat and their ways. The word “Qallunaat” is used universally by Inuit […]

The Physical and Psychological Journeys that the Children of Immigrants Make for their Families By Alexia Raynal Click here for PDF version. {Note: This is the sixth in Zeteo‘s Fall 2014 series of pieces related to borders, the borders here being between countries, between families, and between generations.}   One summer morning about two years ago, as […]

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Last morning, as I skimmed through my favorite books, I bumped into Marjorie Orellana’s Translating Childhoods: Immigrant Youth, Language, and Culture. I had not picked up the book since last year, but it was easy to remember why I like it so much. While speaking mostly about children’s work as translators for their monolingual parents, Orellana also dedicates a brief section […]

ZiR

(Towards Migrants and Migration Acts) Many liberals and human rights advocates supported president Obama’s executive action on immigration last week. Many others, however, are ambivalent about their take on this act. Should we protect families even if parents are undocumented? While the response is obvious to me (yes), I take this ambivalence as a healthy sign of thoughtfulness and change. […]

ZiR

On Saturday, the Los Angeles Times published an opinion piece by Diane Guerrero, the Colombian actress who plays Maritza Ramos in “Orange Is the New Black.” It tells the story of how Guerrero lost her parents to deportation when she was barely 14, starting with her worst fears growing up: Throughout my childhood I watched my parents try to become […]

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Arabian Red Fox, photograph by Jem Babbington, appears on Birds of Saudi Arabia website

On Saturday, the Los Angeles Times published an opinion piece by Diane Guerrero, the Colombian actress who plays Maritza Ramos in “Orange Is the New Black.” It tells the story of how Guerrero lost her parents to deportation when she was barely 14, starting with her worst fears growing up: Throughout my childhood I watched my parents try to become […]

Review

July 25, 2017

[…] Gun. Pour ses explorations des traductions, vers le français, de la poésie, voir, par example, Translating Dickinson, Poetry as Conversation, et Dylan, Nobel, Paris, Chimes Flashing. Some readers may also find of […]

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Categories: Review | Add a Comment
Arabian Red Fox, photograph by Jem Babbington, appears on Birds of Saudi Arabia website

On Saturday, the Los Angeles Times published an opinion piece by Diane Guerrero, the Colombian actress who plays Maritza Ramos in “Orange Is the New Black.” It tells the story of how Guerrero lost her parents to deportation when she was barely 14, starting with her worst fears growing up: Throughout my childhood I watched my parents try to become […]

Review

July 25, 2017

[…] Sex, Politics—is due out in 2017. His previous, Emily-Dickinson-related, multilingual writing: Translating Dickinson (into French) and Dickinson — Sex, Spanish, Stew. Some readers might also be interested in Beyond […]

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Categories: Essay | Add a Comment

On Saturday, the Los Angeles Times published an opinion piece by Diane Guerrero, the Colombian actress who plays Maritza Ramos in “Orange Is the New Black.” It tells the story of how Guerrero lost her parents to deportation when she was barely 14, starting with her worst fears growing up: Throughout my childhood I watched my parents try to become […]

Essay

July 23, 2017

[…] my proposition that a life so lived, so noticing, is a fuller life, a life more zoomed in—see On Savoring, Zeteo, December […]

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