Z e t e o
Reading, Looking, Listening, . . . Questioning
Molly Renda, Water Glass, 2018

By William Eaton   I have proposed previously a first law of American literature, complete with a rider. The law: You are always going to come across one more, intriguing Emily Dickinson poem, ready to reward your attention. The rider: The poem may have something to do with sex. Vivian Pollak, a professor of literature […]

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Emily, in not so foreign tongues   The first law of American literature: Somewhere, somehow, in God only knows what language, you are always going to come across one more, intriguing—if not indeed great—Emily Dickinson poem. A poem that you have previously overlooked, or not even heard of. And yet, there it is, ready to […]

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sometimes I forget what country I’m in I could write poems in bed I think have some Americans look at your awful mov- ie to tell you when you’re wrong & just racist. I got this bug bite that could be anything. — the opening lines of Dissolution, by Eileen Myles[1]   The August 24 […]

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Categories: William Eaton, ZiR | 1 Comment

With marriage women and men had to—or have to—adjust to life with a person who is, in essence, a member of an alien group? My interest in  Emily Dickinson has led me to another classic academic paper, Carroll Smith-Rosenberg’s “The Female World of Love and Ritual: Relations between Women in Nineteenth-Century,” originally published in the journal Signs in […]

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Categories: Review | 4 Comments
Arabian Red Fox, photograph by Jem Babbington, appears on Birds of Saudi Arabia website

By William Eaton   A discussion of four Emily Dickinson poems in the context of Françoise Delphy’s French translations appearing in Poésies complètes : Edition bilingue français-anglais by Emily Dickinson and Françoise Delphy (Flammarion, 2009).   I.  The Articulate Inarticulate An early reader of Emily Dickinson’s poems used this phrase—“the articulate inarticulate”—to describe her, and […]

Review

In a footnote on page 609 of Alfred Habegger’s My Wars Are Laid Away in Books: The Life of Emily Dickinson, I find: In 1903, traveling in Europe with Sue [Emily’s sister-in-law], Martha [one of Emily’s nieces] married Captain Alexander E. Bianchi, supposedly of the Imperial Horse Guard of St. Petersburg. The captain accompanied his […]

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Recent Comments

In a footnote on page 609 of Alfred Habegger’s My Wars Are Laid Away in Books: The Life of Emily Dickinson, I find: In 1903, traveling in Europe with Sue [Emily’s sister-in-law], Martha [one of Emily’s nieces] married Captain Alexander E. Bianchi, supposedly of the Imperial Horse Guard of St. Petersburg. The captain accompanied his […]

ZiR

April 25, 2019

I want a spiritual rats to let money into my room pls m suffering enough no money my children are suffering we don't have money,we need to buy a car n house n change our life like every person just to happy in my family to reach our destiny pls

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Wilfred Owen's mother, pictured center with her family

In a footnote on page 609 of Alfred Habegger’s My Wars Are Laid Away in Books: The Life of Emily Dickinson, I find: In 1903, traveling in Europe with Sue [Emily’s sister-in-law], Martha [one of Emily’s nieces] married Captain Alexander E. Bianchi, supposedly of the Imperial Horse Guard of St. Petersburg. The captain accompanied his […]

ZiR

March 9, 2019

I look forward to reading your piece!

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Wilfred Owen's mother, pictured center with her family

In a footnote on page 609 of Alfred Habegger’s My Wars Are Laid Away in Books: The Life of Emily Dickinson, I find: In 1903, traveling in Europe with Sue [Emily’s sister-in-law], Martha [one of Emily’s nieces] married Captain Alexander E. Bianchi, supposedly of the Imperial Horse Guard of St. Petersburg. The captain accompanied his […]

ZiR

March 9, 2019

You're most welcome....in the Untold Dylan UK site, I connect the song to Helen Jackson's novel and the transcendentalist poets and to the movie 'Ramona' with the song by the same name - under: 'Bob Dylan And Helen Jackson'

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