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Reading, Looking, Listening, . . . Questioning
Categories: Fritz Tucker, ZiLL | 1 Comment

Today I stumbled upon these photos from a 1946 yearbook uploaded to Imgur. The captions speak for themselves, with descriptions like: Vera Brumfield: Our pretty little “fat” girl–nice as they come. Doesn’t really need reducing. Mildred Howerton: Here comes the Navy. She’s got the ring but Mildred, remember, a sailor’s got a gal in every […]

ZiLL

Although the video of this young girl’s spontaneous dance party has been viewed by millions, energetic outbursts by young children on the subway are more typically followed by a parent threatening or abusing the child if he or she doesn’t sit still. I witnessed one such scene on a nearly empty E train the other day. […]

ZiLL
Categories: William Eaton, ZiR | 1 Comment

  Zeteo’s staff is a mix of the graduate-student aged and the emeritus aged, and this helps me (on the emeritus side) see more clearly where my generation is ending up. At a meeting the other day, one young staff member, whose great interest is participatory democracy, was expressing his hopes voire belief that electronic […]

ZiR

In an article titled “Studying Children: Phenomenological Insights” (1986), sociologist Frances Waksler complained about people not taking children seriously. She wanted others to see that children’s actions can “constrain, facilitate, encourage and in myriad ways have implications for others, adults in particular.” To illustrate her point, Waksler provided the following example: Adults are known to “make” children eat […]

ZiR

  In a call with New York Times investors, the company’s chief executive said the Times was seeking to be “unashamedly experimental and willing to adapt.” He was quoted in a newspaper article about how the company was, once again, reporting a quarterly loss, and this not least because of costs associated with buying out […]

ZiR
Categories: Review | Add a Comment

The Visual Humanities and the Future of Communication By Maggie Sattler Review of Graphesis: Visual Forms of Knowledge Production by Johanna Drucker (Harvard University Press, 2014)   In “How E-Reading Threatens Learning in the Humanities,” a July 2014 article in The Chronicle of Higher Education, Naomi S. Baron, a professor of linguistics whose research interests […]

Review

For several years I had the pleasure of working with children’s books. While I did not write them, I did get an insight into the ways books are meant to introduce children to society. Because they are made with such an educational purpose, they offer an insight into the values that are important for the community that produced […]

ZiR

Frances Chaput Waksler’s writings on the sociology of childhood have been a must for people interested in working with children for decades. Her article “Studying Children: Phenomenological Insights” (1986) is one of her most quoted texts. In it, Waksler encourages her readers to substitute the term “less” with “different.” Children as a category, she argues, are not less […]

ZiR

Views about what is good and bad for children vary across cultures. The rural Mennonite community in Chihuahua—perhaps the most visibly cohesive ethnoreligious immigrant group in Mexico—certainly has its own ideas. Briefly put here, Canadian Mennonite immigrants (originally from Russia) began settling in Chihuahua in 1922. Back then, the Mexican government seemed to believe that […]

ZiR
Categories: Drew Whitcup, ZiR | Add a Comment

Yesterday, Politico writer Josh Gerstein addressed the US Supreme Court’s recent decision in the case of Schuette v. Coalition to Defend Affirmative Action, upholding Michigan’s voter-approved ban on the use of racial preference in public university admissions. In 2006, a majority of voters in the state approved a constitutional amendment effectively banning affirmative action in the state […]

ZiR

Scholars have a name for the twentieth-first century adults that get caught up in the care of their elderly parents and younger kids. They call it the “Sandwich Generation.” Claude Berri’s film The Two of Us (1967) offers a tender portrait of the sides of this group. Claude, an 8-year-old Jewish boy, and Pepe, an […]

ZiR

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Categories: Essay | Add a Comment
RealDoll prosthetic device, leg, being repaired

Scholars have a name for the twentieth-first century adults that get caught up in the care of their elderly parents and younger kids. They call it the “Sandwich Generation.” Claude Berri’s film The Two of Us (1967) offers a tender portrait of the sides of this group. Claude, an 8-year-old Jewish boy, and Pepe, an […]

Essay

February 3, 2018

This is, clearly, a continuing story. In an online article in a new UK magazine, The Amorist, computer science professor Kate Devlin urges that sex bots (and digital assistants, like Siri) shouldn't just be "gynoids"; we should have access to "androids" as well. And then there is my personal experience of drawing from the nude. Increasingly, I find or realize, that breasts now often -- and unfortunately! -- are coming in just one, too-perfect shape. (In the augmentation industry it's called "round," and I believe the most popular fill is on the order of 400ccs.) Are we finding that the simples...

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Categories: Review | Add a Comment
Arabian Red Fox, photograph by Jem Babbington, appears on Birds of Saudi Arabia website

Scholars have a name for the twentieth-first century adults that get caught up in the care of their elderly parents and younger kids. They call it the “Sandwich Generation.” Claude Berri’s film The Two of Us (1967) offers a tender portrait of the sides of this group. Claude, an 8-year-old Jewish boy, and Pepe, an […]

Review

July 25, 2017

[…] Gun. Pour ses explorations des traductions, vers le français, de la poésie, voir, par example, Translating Dickinson, Poetry as Conversation, et Dylan, Nobel, Paris, Chimes Flashing. Some readers may also find of […]

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Categories: Review | Add a Comment
Arabian Red Fox, photograph by Jem Babbington, appears on Birds of Saudi Arabia website

Scholars have a name for the twentieth-first century adults that get caught up in the care of their elderly parents and younger kids. They call it the “Sandwich Generation.” Claude Berri’s film The Two of Us (1967) offers a tender portrait of the sides of this group. Claude, an 8-year-old Jewish boy, and Pepe, an […]

Review

July 25, 2017

[…] Sex, Politics—is due out in 2017. His previous, Emily-Dickinson-related, multilingual writing: Translating Dickinson (into French) and Dickinson — Sex, Spanish, Stew. Some readers might also be interested in Beyond […]

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