Z e t e o
Reading, Looking, Listening, . . . Questioning

Click for PDF. Science B By William Eaton William Eaton is the Executive Editor of Zeteo; his explorations appear almost weekly at Montaigbakhtinian.com. Let us begin gently, with, before theory, anecdote. After playing his violin for a range of non-human creatures, Michel-Paul-Guy de Chabanon, an eighteenth-century musician and philosopher, concluded that spiders are pleased by […]

Essay
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Poetry as Conversation By William Eaton   Discussion, orchestrated by William Eaton, of Haikus du temps présent by Mayuzumi Madoka, translated into French by Corinne Atlan (Philippe Picquier, 2012).[1]   In a museum gift shop I came across a book of translations, Haiku Love, credited to Alan Cummings of the School of Oriental and African […]

Review
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A Week of Reading from . . . William Eaton, Zeteo Executive Editor [One in an ongoing series of posts. For the full series see Zeteo is Reading. This one was first posted 15-21 September 2013.] 15 September 2013: K.J. Dover, Greek Homosexuality As this is a season for reading manuscripts that are being submitted for Zeteo’s […]

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Asano_Takeji-No_Series-Snow_at_Iwashimizu_Hachiman_Shrine_Kyoto

A Week of Reading from . . . William Eaton, Zeteo Executive Editor [One in an ongoing series of posts. For the full series see Zeteo is Reading. This one was first posted 15-21 September 2013.] 15 September 2013: K.J. Dover, Greek Homosexuality As this is a season for reading manuscripts that are being submitted for Zeteo’s […]

ZiR

July 16, 2018

Thanks a lot, Steve. And, continuing the segue-ing, here's an old (and traditional) Gary Snyder poem I just came across yesterday: Seaman’s Ditty I’m wondering where you are now Married, or mad, or free: Wherever you are you’re likely glad, But memory troubles me. We could’ve had us children, We could’ve had a home— But you thought not, and I thought not, And these nine years we roam. Today I worked in the deep dark tanks, And climbed out to watch the sea: Gulls and salty waves pass by, And mountains of Araby. I’ve travelled the lonely oceans And wandered the...

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Asano_Takeji-No_Series-Snow_at_Iwashimizu_Hachiman_Shrine_Kyoto

A Week of Reading from . . . William Eaton, Zeteo Executive Editor [One in an ongoing series of posts. For the full series see Zeteo is Reading. This one was first posted 15-21 September 2013.] 15 September 2013: K.J. Dover, Greek Homosexuality As this is a season for reading manuscripts that are being submitted for Zeteo’s […]

ZiR

July 16, 2018

A very nice piece, William. I am reminded of a Sung Dynasty poem that D.T. Suzuki quotes in one of his books. I'm not sure of its relevance here, but it seems to resonate somehow. Misty rain on Mount Lu, And waves surging at Che Kiang. When you have not been there, Many a regret you have; But once there and homeward you wend, How matter-of-fact things look! Misty rain on Mount Lu And waves surging at Che Kiang.

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Frank Kermode, August 2000, photo by Charlie MacDonald

A Week of Reading from . . . William Eaton, Zeteo Executive Editor [One in an ongoing series of posts. For the full series see Zeteo is Reading. This one was first posted 15-21 September 2013.] 15 September 2013: K.J. Dover, Greek Homosexuality As this is a season for reading manuscripts that are being submitted for Zeteo’s […]

Essay

June 14, 2018

The time that takes place in stories compared to the time that we actually live is radically abbreviated. It briskly sweeps aside all the commonplace moments that make up the long stretch of toilsome time and focuses instead on the interesting and compelling. With a mere section break or a simple transitional phrase, days, months, and whole years are disposed of as if they had no significance at all. “Then time passed slowly until the day arrived when….” A lot of important living is hidden in such a phrase. From the moment-to-moment flow of time, the storyteller lifts out only those narr...

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